Jennifer Owen to give presentation on January 14, 2016 at the Fourth Annual Education Conference of the Apartment Association of Greater Dallas

Jennifer Owen will give a presentation on Crises Response Plans for Property Management at the Fourth Annual Education Conference of the Apartment Association of Greater Dallas, to be held on January 14, 2016. The conference will be held at The Embassy Suites Hotel and Conference Center in Frisco, Texas.

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The Firm’s Lenders360blog.com post on Syndicated vs. Participated Loan Structures ranked #1 in Google search on topic

Syndicated and participated loan structures present unique challenges. Our blog post on the differences between each is the #1 Google search result on this topic – perhaps because regulators currently are focusing on these structures. Contact Firm attorneys Tom Higier at 972-716-1859, Stefan Zane at 972-759-1427, or Jason Rodriguez at 972-759-1359 to discuss this hot topic, and take a look at our #1 ranked blog post by clicking on the link below:

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Stuart Lautin to conduct course, “What you need to know about Commercial Properties” on October 1, 2015

Stuart Lautin will conduct the course, “What you need to know about Commercial Properties” on October 1, 2015, at the Central Texas Commercial Association of Realtors Commercial Event in Killeen, Texas. The course objective is for the attendees to gain a base understanding of TREC requirements, as found in the Texas Occupations Code and interpreted by Texas Administrative Code, governing TREC licensees (brokers and sales agents) in Texas commercial leasing as well as commercial purchase and sale transactions. Included are interactive discussions and analysis of: (a) fiduciary duties; (b) current case studies; and (c) current laws and regulations.

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Jason Rodriguez authors “A Loophole Big Enough to be a Wormhole” for Lenders 360

Jason Rodriguez authors a blog at lenders360blog.com. Read the post below.

Like most bank defendants, Key Bank was looking for the quickest way out of a $5 million fraudulent transfer lawsuit brought by a chapter 7 Trustee. Rather than wait to win in the standard path of arguing facts, the bank relied on the broad and powerful “safe harbor” provision of the bankruptcy code which protects certain transfers from recovery. In doing so, the bank utilized a technical, but effective, argument to avoid the need for trial and simply exit the case where it entered…

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